vehicle identification number (VIN)

What’s In A VIN?

Ever wonder what that long group of numbers and letters identifying your car means? There is some method to the madness. While the various bumper stickers on the back of your car tell people who you are, the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) tells the world who your car is.

Mechanics use the VIN to identify engine type and other parts to service a vehicle, law enforcement can use the VIN to identify stolen vehicles, and manufacturers use it to resolve safety recalls.

Where’s My VIN?

You’ve probably had to find the VIN on your vehicle at some point. Because the VIN unlocks information about your car, you’ll see it on car titles, insurance policies and auto service records.

The location on the car will vary by year and manufacturer, but you’ll usually find it on the dashboard (you’ll be able to see it through the front windshield), on a sticker inside the driver’s side door or on the engine block.

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Cracking The Da-VIN-ci Code

Under standards set by the National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration (NHTSA), every car and truck model year 1981 or later has a unique 17-digit VIN. Here is how the VIN is assigned.

Additional Resources

With all of the information your VIN provides, there are online resources that will help you during the used car buying process or to learn more about your car. A little research can prevent a costly flood-damaged vehicle purchase or oversight of a dangerous safety recall.

Having your VIN handy makes getting a car insurance quote that much faster. It only takes a few minutes to find out how much you could save on GEICO car insurance. Start your fast, free quote here.

By Nathan Erb

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  1. Janet Mercier says,

    This is a great format…. I have learned a lot of things that you share here so keep the information coming…. More road testing quizzes would be a great way to refresh people’s memory of the Standard Rules of the Road…
    Thank you kindly…
    Janet

  2. Douglas Bjerke says,

    I’ve went to a number of drivers ed training classes and company schools on driving over my 35 years of driving co vehicles Your question about fallowing distance.I have been told and in written material that two ,three and four seconds are correct. It depends on the instructor. And the material he’s using. I also have been told driving in either lane is ok just drive in the lane of least resistance. I believe that bull ,Drive in the right lane pass in the left lane. There are states with highway signs stating just that … thanks for the test.

  3. Carol Morris says,

    Move from Ohio in 2004 after 64 1/2 years to Cape Canaveral ,Fl. to lean this news. I am glad you told me about the ViN. I never knew that. It will come in handy. Now I can tell my kids and grand-daughter that grandma does still know a few things at 77. LOL

  4. CAROLYN says,

    I went 2 DRIVING SCHOOL IN 1960, + LEARNED FOR EVERY 10MPH YOU ARE GOING YOU SHOULD BE @ LEAST ONE CAR LENGTH AWAY. IF YOUR GOING 50MPH, YOU SHOULD BE @ LEAST 5 CAR LENGTS AWAY GOING 50MPH PER HOUR,

  5. Frances R Kirby says,

    Thank-you for the very helpful tips.
    Especially the vin number. I found that to be very interesting. Keep the info coming. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER!

  6. Drew Harrison says,

    I’m really glad that I’ve done VIN checks in the past. I was dealing with a shady local seller online and they told me the car was perfect. I took it to have the VIN checked and it had numerous repairs recently that would be a ton of money to fix again. I’m really glad I did my research on that one.