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(Quiz) Are You A Road Hog?

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Most of us are taught as kids that sharing is the right thing to do. But drivers of cars, as well as riders of motorcycles and bicycles can seem more apt to stoke each other’s rage than happily share the road.

And with more people commuting to work on bicycles than ever before (across cities, the average increase from 2000 to 2013 was 62 percent, according to the League of American Bicyclists), it’s crucial that all drivers watch out for each other. Answer the following questions to see if your road-sharing skills need sharpening.

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  1. Question 1 of 7
    1. Question

    Traffic laws are written for…

    Correct

    Everyone. Those on the road should be aware of pedestrians and other vehicles.

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    Everyone. Those on the road should be aware of pedestrians and other vehicles.

  2. Question 2 of 7
    2. Question

    True or False: When you’re in a car approaching a bicyclist, it is a good idea to honk your horn to alert them to your presence.

    Correct

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), while honking drivers may be well-intentioned, bicyclists say honking makes them feel vulnerable on the road. Keep your hand off the horn except in emergencies.

    Incorrect

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), while honking drivers may be well-intentioned, bicyclists say honking makes them feel vulnerable on the road. Keep your hand off the horn except in emergencies.

  3. Question 3 of 7
    3. Question

    When a motorcycle or bike is about to enter the road from a driveway or from between two parked cars and a vehicle is approaching, who has the right of way?

    Correct

    According to NHTSA, one of the top mistakes motorcycle and bicycle riders make is suddenly riding out from a driveway or between parked cars. Drivers don’t expect other vehicles to enter the road from the middle of the block. The rule: The vehicle on the road has the right of way; the motorcyclist or bicyclist must yield.

    Incorrect

    According to NHTSA, one of the top mistakes motorcycle and bicycle riders make is suddenly riding out from a driveway or between parked cars. Drivers don’t expect other vehicles to enter the road from the middle of the block. The rule: The vehicle on the road has the right of way; the motorcyclist or bicyclist must yield.

  4. Question 4 of 7
    4. Question

    True or False: If you’re behind a motorcycle and its turn signal is flashing, it’s safe to assume the rider intends to turn, which means you can speed up and proceed.

    Correct

    Unlike cars, motorcycles may have non-cancelling signals, which means riders could forget their signal is on, according to NHTSA. Never proceed until you see the motorcycle turning.

    Incorrect

    Unlike cars, motorcycles may have non-cancelling signals, which means riders could forget their signal is on, according to NHTSA. Never proceed until you see the motorcycle turning.

  5. Question 5 of 7
    5. Question

    How many seconds of following distance should drivers stay behind motorcyclists?

    Correct

    Motorcyclists don’t always use brakes to slow down, so you may not see a brake light in time. To avoid being surprised, allow 3 to 4 seconds between you and the motorcycle: Look ahead at a stationary object (a tree or sign), and when the motorcycle passes that object, slowly start counting. If you reach the object before you’ve counted to 4, you’re too close.

    Incorrect

    Motorcyclists don’t always use brakes to slow down, so you may not see a brake light in time. To avoid being surprised, allow 3 to 4 seconds between you and the motorcycle: Look ahead at a stationary object (a tree or sign), and when the motorcycle passes that object, slowly start counting. If you reach the object before you’ve counted to 4, you’re too close.

  6. Question 6 of 7
    6. Question

    In certain states, new bicycles are required to have which of the following safety equipment?

    Correct

    Even if your state doesn’t yet have these regulations, consider using all safety options.

    Incorrect

    Even if your state doesn’t yet have these regulations, consider using all safety options.

  7. Question 7 of 7
    7. Question

    Lane splitting (riding a motorcycle between lanes of slow moving or stopped traffic moving in the same direction) is permitted in:

    Correct

    While lane splitting is expressly prohibited in most states, it is permissible in California as long as it is done in a safe and prudent manner, according to the California Highway Patrol. Drivers in California should take special care when changing lanes: always signal your intentions, check your mirrors and blind spots carefully, and never intentionally block or impede a motorcyclist.

    Incorrect

    While lane splitting is expressly prohibited in most states, it is permissible in California as long as it is done in a safe and prudent manner, according to the California Highway Patrol. Drivers in California should take special care when changing lanes: always signal your intentions, check your mirrors and blind spots carefully, and never intentionally block or impede a motorcyclist.

Shopping around for motorcycle insurance? Get a free quote from GEICO today.

By Paula Derrow

Illustration by Peter Grundy

Read more: How to share the road with big vehicles