The Importance of Renters Insurance

Spend now or save for later? It’s an age old dilemma that hits closer to home now more than ever because of the recent economic downturn. While deciding against buying a 52″ plasma television or postponing your Hawaiian dream vacation can be sound financial decisions, one corner we suggest not cutting is purchasing renters insurance.

Imagine coming home from work to find your apartment broken into and completely ransacked—gone are your expensive stereo system and fine china. Or even worse, suppose you return from a long weekend only to discover there was a fire in your kitchen. You can’t assume your landlord will pay for your damaged or lost possessions. In fact, you can probably assume they won’t. You’ll need a renters insurance policy to help recoup your losses.

Unfortunately, renters insurance often falls under the radar. Approximately 80% of renters do not carry renters insurance. That’s a staggering number considering a typical policy only costs between $150 and $300 a year—depending on where you live. For this reason alone, renters insurance is an excellent idea for anyone who rents a home.

How much coverage do you need?

The first step in purchasing a renters insurance policy is adding up the cost of everything you would want to replace if it were damaged or stolen—including clothing, electronics, furniture and appliances. Write down the serial numbers of appliances and electronics. In case of a fire, keep a copy of the list somewhere outside your home (at work, perhaps). You also may also take photos or make a videotape of your most valuable items. That will make it easier to make a claim on them if they are lost or stolen.

Something else to take into consideration is “actual cash value” (ACV) or “replacement cost coverage” for your belongings. As the name implies, ACV coverage will pay only for what your property was worth at the time it was damaged or stolen. With an actual cash value policy, if a tree falls through your window and destroys your computer that cost $2,500 when it was new four years ago but is now only worth $1,000, you will only receive $1,000 (minus your deductible) for the damaged item. Replacement cost coverage, on the other hand, will pay what it actually costs to replace the items you lost. Replacement cost coverage will cost you more in premiums, but it will also pay out more if you ever need to file a claim.

What else is covered?

Personal Liability Coverage provides protection for you, the renter, and anyone who may visit your home or apartment in case of an accident. If a person who is visiting you is injured in some manner, you will not be held liable for the injuries. If necessary, your policy may even pay for your legal defense in these circumstances.

Loss of Use/Temporary Housing will cover you if your home or apartment is rendered unlivable by a fire or other disaster. Generally, this coverage provides temporary housing while your residence is repaired or rebuilt.

Car Interior – Many renters insurance policies also cover possessions that you keep in your car (CDs, books, portable computer equipment). Note that the car’s value itself is not covered, and typically installed stereo equipment (which is often considered “part” of the car’s systems) is not insured either.

What’s not covered?

Earthquakes, flood and landslide protection is not commonly included on rental insurance policies. If you live in an area where these natural disasters are common, coverage for your personal possessions lost in one of the aforementioned occurrences must be purchased as add-ons or via separate insurance policies altogether.

Getting Started

Ready to purchase a renters insurance policy? We’ve got good news for you—GEICO can help. Call us at 1-800-841-2964 to speak with a licensed insurance agent or get an online renters insurance quote.

The above is meant as general information and as general policy descriptions to help you understand the different types of coverages. These descriptions do not refer to any specific contract of insurance and they do not modify any definitions expressly stated in any contracts of insurance. We encourage you to speak to your insurance representative and to read your policy contract to fully understand your coverages.

By Chris McLaughlin

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  1. Paige Smith says

    As a college student, I never really think about rental insurance. However, I think I really should. Especially since I am renting an apartment.

  2. Kyle Ross says

    I didn’t realize renters insurance could be so cheap! My wife and I are currently living in a rented home, but we don’t have renters insurance yet. Now, knowing the low cost and high benefits of having insurance, we will definitely look into setting it up. You never know when something could happen, so it’s best to be prepared!

  3. Bob Conway says

    Last year I moved to an apartment where renters insurance was required for all residents. I resented being forced into it but had to pay. After heavy rains, I was shocked to find water had seeped UP from the foundation, through the carpet and soaked into a few dozen record albums. You know … those 12″ vinyl things with paper jackets. Suddenly I was very thankful I had renters insurance until reading the policy to find out water damage was NOT covered.

    But if the place ever burns down … I’m good (maybe)! 🙂

  4. Debra says

    I really appreciate the information about the insurance. It was very informative and gave me knowledge that I need since I’m renting.

  5. Kervin Franco says

    Excellent information to share with your client, I truly appreciate that Geico takes the time to educate the customer in understanding policy information.

    Thanks Geico for the peace of mimd,

  6. Diane Ashworth says

    I own several expensive fur jackets. They are in cold storage now. Can they be insured in a rental policy? I’m renting from my brother and pay a monthly fee. Thank you for your time. Diane